Train what you suck at

Train what you suck at! What does this even mean? I think we have all heard the saying ‘You are only as strong as your weakest link‘.

Training what you suck at should be the top priority when we are talking about training for sports. When we do our initial testing we look for the weakest link. We need to address the issue. We need to progress you to the point you do not suck!

Train what you suck at - Stretching - FuncMove Experts

I had a college football player who could do some amazing things athletically. He ran a 4.4 40 yard dash, jumped 42 inches vertically, bench pressed 200 kg, and could squat a small house if needed. You would have thought this kid was a stud by seeing this but there was one thing he could not do. He could not move laterally to save his life. He looked like a big goofy klutz when he shuffled his feet.

We designed a program based around his weakness. It mentally and physically drained him. After two weeks he strayed away from the program and just did what fed his ego, bench press and squat. He ended up transferring schools since he could not get on the field and had a below average career. If only he had worked on what he sucked at.

For the rest of the world we might not be training to make a team or to get a professional sports contract but we should still be challenging ourselves. I believe overcoming the mental battle with exercise has great health benefits both physically and mentally. The sense of accomplishment of conquering a goal feels great. What challenges you? What pushes you? What are you thinking of right now as you read this? There is an endless list of what could suck but thats 100 % on you and up to you. Either way I challenge you to not suck at whatever you suck at!!!

Train what you suck at - revvll Challenge - FuncMove Experts

Do you suck at

  • Sprinting or distance running?
  • Bodyweight training? Push Ups – Pull Ups – Pistol Squats – Suspension Training
  • Strength training? Kettebells – Olympic Lifts – Barbell – Sandbag – Grip work
  • Mobility or stability?

I think you get the point. We tend to shy away from stuff we suck at. I am not saying you need to do power cleans or run a marathon but i am saying it is important to continually push and challenge yourself in ways that make sense for you. Try something new. Try something again that you quit. Challenge yourself. Don’t stop doing something because you suck at it. Stop doing something because it has become too easy for you because you conquered it.

Yours in Health and Performance,
James T. Ferris

Author: Jim Ferris

Jim Ferris is a Philadelphia based trainer whose clientele includes professional athletes, local teams, everyday fitness enthusiasts, and maybe a celebrity or two depending on who is in town. Jim is known for his work in the basketball community from training with the Philadelphia 76ers for many years and training several NBA players that live their offseason in the Philadelphia area. Jim’s expertise in the training field, along with his dynamic and creative training style keeps players, coaches and clients coming back year after year. Click here to visit James homepage and here to follow him on Facebook.

One Comment Leave a comment

    Ben Menges 24. October 2015 at 1:10 AM #

    Servus Jim.
    Ja, leider, leider ist dies ein leidiges Thema. Habe in den letzten Monaten sehr viel an der Mobilität gearbeitet. Ein großer Punkt bei mir. Ich bin immer noch recht unterdurchschnittlich (verglichen unter Athleten), aber die Ergebnisse waren super. Irgendwann hat es mir sogar Spaß gemacht mal nicht in jedem Training 110 % zu geben, sondern auch mal an der Mobility zu arbeiten. Foam Roller, Lacrosse-Ball, Superbands etc. haben auch ihren Reiz. Vor allem, da ich nun eine bessere Technik erlernen kann und so auch bessere Ergebnisse in anderen Disziplinen haben werde. Nächste Baustelle: Bodyweighttraining. Dann: Agilität.

    Ben Menges

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